About that monitoring software…..

+This year Stockton Unified has deployed a software program that allows teachers to see on the teachers’ computer monitor what the students in a class have on their screens.  Teachers have expressed frustration with keeping students on task when there are so many easily available distractions online. Last year a few sites piloted a couple potential solutions, and NETOP became the obvious choice.  The software is easy to use and seems rather intuitive. It does require that the teacher uses Google Classroom, the teacher must have a Google Classroom with a roster for each individual class session. That GClassroom roster is what NETOP uses to decide which students to monitor. If students transfer out of a class the teacher needs to drop that student from the GClassroom so the student can become available to the teacher that is receiving the student. To set yourself up with NETOP, follow the handy dandy user guide here:  NetopVisionforChromebooks_UserGuide Teachers

Pic of teacher and students

Netop software provides a number of sound tools to the teacher, but nothing beats moving around the room working with the kids.

While many teachers have stated that they are looking forward to being able to see what is on students’ screens, but that is far from the most powerful aspect of this software. This software allows the teacher to broadcast content to individual Chromebooks, solving the problem of weak projector bulbs or no projector at all. Instead of trying to see what the teacher is projecting across the room, the student will be able to see it on their own Chromebook! This alone can be a gamechanger for many classrooms!

This tool supports a number of powerful learning strategies but sitting at the desk playing gotcha is not one of them. We suggest when you first start using the tool that you project all of the students’ screens up on the wall, mention that you CAN monitor what they are doing, and then go about your business, moving through the room delivering solid instruction, because, at the end of the day, it is solid instruction that matters.

 

Number Talks

“My students struggle with number sense.”

“I have students that don’t know their basic facts.”

“The students in my classroom lack the ability to reason about math problems.”

Common phrases heard in math classrooms. I have said them when I was teaching and I hear them now all too often in professional development sessions. But why? Why are our students not grasping these skills under our guidance? What are students missing? Our teachers are implementing the standards, providing engaging lessons, and reinforcing skills all throughout the year. What else can be done? But alas I have the answer!

Number talks. Short math conversations where students solve problems in ways that are meaningful to them. Little to no prep on the part of the teacher, with a huge return from students! You read that right, little to NO PREP on the part of the teacher. Why wouldn’t you try it?

Number talks, developed in the early 1990’s, have recently resurfaced with the shift of implementing the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics. The CA Math Framework references them as a strategy for increasing math discourse in the classroom and supporting the 8 Mathematical Practices that are foundational for learning in the CCSS. The Framework says, “the problems in a number talk are designed to elicit specific strategies that focus on number relationships and number theory. Students are given problems in either a whole- or small-group setting and are expected to mentally solve them accurately, efficiently, and flexibly. By sharing and defending their solutions and strategies, students have the opportunity to collectively reason about numbers while building connections to key conceptual ideas in mathematics.” (CDE, 2016) Implemented routinely for about 10 minutes a session, number talks have shown to increase students mathematical abilities to think flexibly, examine errors, identify misconceptions, and solve computation problems. All in all showing a strong understanding of number sense, fluency with math facts, and the ability reason about math without struggle.

numbertalk

But, don’t just take my word for it, hear from Sherry Parish, the author of Number Talks. Listen as she describes the process and its success. Consider watching students engage in at all grade levels. Dive in and take a look at the Number Talk resources linked in your SUSD Unit of Study resources; all available as Google Slide presentations (NO PREP) and chunked in a variety of skill sets.   And, finally ask for support or a demo in your classroom by reaching out to your site Instructional Coach or me, Angela Pilcher, at the Curriculum Department.

Ten minutes a day will change your phrases to

“My students are strong in their number sense!”

“I have students that know their basic facts!”

“The students in my classroom have the ability to reason about math problems!”