3D Rendering

Humans are creative creatures. Whether finding ways to turn branches and leaves into shelter, or turning whale oil into candles, or tweaking electrical signals to be able to transmit voice through a telephone. Innovation is often born of necessity, but it can also be the catalyst which transforms innocent curiosity into great discover and growth. Not all of our students are on grade level, or proficient in every subject, but every student in all of our classes is creative, and we should be using that to teach them deeper level thinking and analytical skills. This is where 3D rendering comes in.

In talking with other teachers it seems likely that at most of our schools there is probably at least one classroom with a 3D printer in it. That allows for rendering to be taken to another level, but is hardly a requirement for students to be able to get something substantial out of it. In fact, we have yet to print anything out all year, but my students regularly render objects for an assortment of tasks.

Fifth grade math we get into three dimensional shapes and learn volume. Students can use place values cubes and other manipulatives, or they can draw out 3D shapes on graph paper. These are good ways to gain a conceptual understanding of shape. Though when you have to attend to precision in rendering a rectangular prism, ensuring sides measure out exactly as they are supposed to, students have to access a level of thinking and analyzing their creation deeper than stacking cubed manipulatives.

Image of a student produced 3D bridge renderingScience brings up a variety of ways we can take advantage of 3D rendering. Classes in many grades have students tackle engineering design challenges, and allowing them to create something much more significant than toothpicks in marshmallows allows these challenges to become more meaningful. You also have the ability to add constraints to their builds. If students need to create a bridge, you can give size requirements/limitations and students need to think more analytically to bring their designs to life while following these outlines.

Teaching modern or digital art can offer other uses. There are a variety of free programs or websites available for use, such as Tinkercad, but many require students to make accounts that have to be verified by a parent, so that needs to be done ahead of time. If you are not sure how you may use it, try one for yourself and explore. Your students may amaze you with what they can create. Last year my students designed the keychains we 3D printed and sold at the school carnival!

 

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